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Diagnostic criteria for 300.29 Specific Phobia

These criteria are obsolete.

DSM Criteria
DSM Version
DSM IV - TR
DSM Criteria

A. Marked and persistent fear that is excessive or unreasonable, cued by the presence or anticipation of a specific object or situation (e.g., flying, heights, animals, receiving an injection, seeing blood). 

B. Exposure to the phobic stimulus almost invariably provokes an immediate anxiety response, which may take the form of a situationally bound or situationally predisposed Panic Attack
Note: In children, the anxiety may be expressed by crying, tantrums, freezing, or clinging. 

C. The person recognizes that the fear is excessive or unreasonable. Note: In children, this feature may be absent. 

D. The phobic situation(s) is avoided or else is endured with intense anxiety or distress. 

E. The avoidance, anxious anticipation, or distress in the feared situation(s) interferes significantly with the person's normal routine, occupational (or academic) functioning, or social activities or relationships, or there is marked distress about having the phobia. 

F. In individuals under age 18 years, the duration is at least 6 months. 

G. The anxiety, Panic Attacks, or phobic avoidance associated with the specific object or situation are not better accounted for by another mental disorder, such as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (e.g., fear of dirt in someone with an obsession about contamination), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (e.g., avoidance of stimuli associated with a severe stressor),Separation Anxiety Disorder (e.g., avoidance of school), Social Phobia (e.g., avoidance of social situations because of fear of embarrassment), Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia, or Agoraphobia Without History of Panic Disorder

Specify type:

Animal Type 
Natural Environment Type (e.g., heights, storms, water) 
Blood-Injection-Injury Type 
Situational Type (e.g., airplanes, elevators, enclosed places) 
Other Type (e.g., phobic avoidance of situations that may lead to choking, vomiting, or contracting an illness; in children, avoidance of loud sounds or costumed characters)

Reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Copyright 2000 American Psychiatric Association

DSM Version
DSM IV
DSM Criteria

A. Marked and persistent fear that is excessive or unreasonable, cued by the presence or anticipation of a specific object or situation (e.g., flying, heights, animals, receiving an injection, seeing blood). 

B. Exposure to the phobic stimulus almost invariably provokes an immediate anxiety response, which may take the form of a situationally bound or situationally predisposed Panic Attack
Note: In children, the anxiety may be expressed by crying, tantrums, freezing, or clinging. 

C. The person recognizes that the fear is excessive or unreasonable. Note: In children, this feature may be absent. 

D. The phobic situation(s) is avoided or else is endured with intense anxiety or distress. 

E. The avoidance, anxious anticipation, or distress in the feared situation(s) interferes significantly with the person's normal routine, occupational (or academic) functioning, or social activities or relationships, or there is marked distress about having the phobia. 

F. In individuals under age 18 years, the duration is at least 6 months. 

G. The anxiety, Panic Attacks, or phobic avoidance associated with the specific object or situation are not better accounted for by another mental disorder, such as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (e.g., fear of dirt in someone with an obsession about contamination), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (e.g., avoidance of stimuli associated with a severe stressor),Separation Anxiety Disorder (e.g., avoidance of school), Social Phobia (e.g., avoidance of social situations because of fear of embarrassment), Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia, or Agoraphobia Without History of Panic Disorder

Specify type:

Animal Type 
Natural Environment Type (e.g., heights, storms, water) 
Blood-Injection-Injury Type 
Situational Type (e.g., airplanes, elevators, enclosed places) 
Other Type (e.g., phobic avoidance of situations that may lead to choking, vomiting, or contracting an illness; in children, avoidance of loud sounds or costumed characters)

Reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Copyright 2000 American Psychiatric Association