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The King's Speech

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Cast
Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, Geoffrey Rush
Released
2010
nicotine | tobacco
Spoiler alert
Blog entry

(Times from screening disc may differ from those in published versions.)

Although the problem here is stuttering, untrained, self-styled speech therapist Lionel Logue appears to use psychotherapy to greatest benefit for this patient. He appears to attribute Bertie's stuttering to childhood emotional trauma and abuse (acquired stuttering?). Although Logue enforces some boundaries, such as insisting that the treatment take place in his office, he also insists that he and the patient treat each others as equals, a bit of challenge for the king.

Bertie (the future King George VI) stutters (involuntary stuttering) while attempting to give a speech to a large audience. (0:04) He appears to exhibit communicative pressure/communicative stress and postponement behaviors. Does he exhibit abulia? tonic block? silent block?

As Bertie draws on a cigarette an older man, presumably some kind of speech therapist, exhorts him, "Inhale deep into your lungs Your Royal Highness. It relaxes your larynx. Does it not? Cigarette smoking calms the nerves, and uh gives you confidence." He tries to treat Bertie's stuttering by having him speak with his mouth full of glass marbles. (0:05)

Bertie's first treatment session with speech therapist Lionel Logue. (0:19)

Logue asks Bertie to refrain from smoking: "I believe sucking smoke into your lungs will kill you." Bertie responds, "My physicians say it relaxes the throat." Logue replies, "They're idiots." (0:22)

A series of treatment sessions. (0:36, 1:00, 1:17)

Bertie's father, King George V, dies. (0:43)

Logue introduces the technique of having Bertie sing his words. The rhythm method? (0:49)

Bertie talks about the death of his oldest brother at age 13. (0:54)

Bertie tells Logue how he learned his techniques: "When the great war came all our soldiers were returning to Australia from the front, a lot of them shellshocked, unable to speak." (1:25)

Reference in To Rome with Love