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Diagnostic criteria for Sexual Dysfunction Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]

These criteria are obsolete.

DSM Criteria
DSM Version
DSM IV - TR
DSM Criteria

A. Clinically significant sexual dysfunction that results in marked distress or interpersonal difficulty predominates in the clinical picture. 

B. There is evidence from the history, physical examination, or laboratory findings that the sexual dysfunction is fully explained by the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition. 

C. The disturbance is not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g.,Major Depressive Disorder). 

Select code and term based on the predominant sexual dysfunction: 

625.8 Female Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if deficient or absent sexual desire is the predominant feature 
608.89 Male Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if deficient or absent sexual desire is the predominant feature 
607.84 Male Erectile Disorder Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if male erectile dysfunction is the predominant feature 
625.0 Female Dyspareunia Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if pain associated with intercourse is the predominant feature 
608.89 Male Dyspareunia Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if pain associated with intercourse is the predominant feature 
625.8 Other Female Sexual Dysfunction Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if some other feature is predominant (e.g., Orgasmic Disorder) or no feature predominates 
608.89 Other Male Sexual Dysfunction Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if some other feature is predominant (e.g., Orgasmic Disorder) or no feature predominates 
Coding note: Include the name of the general medical condition onAxis I, e.g., 607.84 Male Erectile Disorder Due to Diabetes Mellitus; also code the general medical condition on Axis III (see Appendix G for codes).

Reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Copyright 2000 American Psychiatric Association

DSM Version
DSM IV
DSM Criteria

A. Clinically significant sexual dysfunction that results in marked distress or interpersonal difficulty predominates in the clinical picture. 

B. There is evidence from the history, physical examination, or laboratory findings that the sexual dysfunction is fully explained by the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition. 

C. The disturbance is not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g.,Major Depressive Disorder). 

Select code and term based on the predominant sexual dysfunction: 

625.8 Female Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if deficient or absent sexual desire is the predominant feature 
608.89 Male Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if deficient or absent sexual desire is the predominant feature 
607.84 Male Erectile Disorder Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if male erectile dysfunction is the predominant feature 
625.0 Female Dyspareunia Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if pain associated with intercourse is the predominant feature 
608.89 Male Dyspareunia Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if pain associated with intercourse is the predominant feature 
625.8 Other Female Sexual Dysfunction Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if some other feature is predominant (e.g., Orgasmic Disorder) or no feature predominates 
608.89 Other Male Sexual Dysfunction Due to...[Indicate the General Medical Condition]: if some other feature is predominant (e.g., Orgasmic Disorder) or no feature predominates 
Coding note: Include the name of the general medical condition onAxis I, e.g., 607.84 Male Erectile Disorder Due to Diabetes Mellitus; also code the general medical condition on Axis III (see Appendix G for codes).

Reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Copyright 1994 American Psychiatric Association