Back to top

Diagnostic criteria for 291.8 Alcohol Withdrawal (new code as of 10/01/96: 291.81)

These criteria are obsolete.

DSM Criteria
DSM Version
DSM IV - TR
DSM Criteria

A. Cessation of (or reduction in) alcohol use that has been heavy and prolonged. 

B. Two (or more) of the following, developing within several hours to a few days after Criterion A:

(1) autonomic hyperactivity (e.g., sweating or pulse rate greater than 100) 
(2) increased hand tremor 
(3) insomnia 
(4) nausea or vomiting 
(5) transient visual, tactile, or auditory hallucinations or illusions 
(6) psychomotor agitation 
(7) anxiety 
(8) grand mal seizures 

C. The symptoms in Criterion B cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. 

D. The symptoms are not due to a general medical condition and are not better accounted for by another mental disorder. Specify if: With Perceptual Disturbances

Reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Copyright 2000 American Psychiatric Association

DSM Version
DSM IV
DSM Criteria

A. Cessation of (or reduction in) alcohol use that has been heavy and prolonged. 

B. Two (or more) of the following, developing within several hours to a few days after Criterion A:

(1) autonomic hyperactivity (e.g., sweating or pulse rate greater than 100) 
(2) increased hand tremor 
(3) insomnia 
(4) nausea or vomiting 
(5) transient visual, tactile, or auditory hallucinations or illusions 
(6) psychomotor agitation 
(7) anxiety 
(8) grand mal seizures 

C. The symptoms in Criterion B cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. 

D. The symptoms are not due to a general medical condition and are not better accounted for by another mental disorder. Specify if: With Perceptual Disturbances

Reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Copyright 1994 American Psychiatric Association